Nebraska head coach had one last task to complete with UCF before moving on to Lincoln full-time, and it was one he did not feel would end well. In the postgame celebration in the locker room as UCF celebrated their Peach Bowl victory over Auburn to complete a 13-0 season, leading UCF a case to claim a national championship, Frost reportedly admitted to his UCF players he was skeptical about their chances of winning the game.

“Coming back and trying to help you win this thing, if I’m keeping it real, I didn’t think we had a damn chance because of all the circumstances surrounding it,” Frost reportedly told his team, according to The Orlando Sentinel. “But you guys found a way to dial it in, you found a way to play harder than them.”

The quote comes from a featurette video produced by UCF honoring the latest accomplishment. You can hear the quote in the last couple of minutes of the video.

In the video, Frost tells UCF players he will be heading off to Nebraska to try and put together another group of players that have a similar bond to the ones UCF had during their undefeated run. UCF has hired former Missouri offensive coordinator Josh Heupel to be the next head coach, while Frost is now working at Nebraska.

After losing Josh Heupel as an offensive coordinator to be the head coach at UCF, Missouri head coach Barry Odom needed to find a replacement. He ended up bringing former Tennessee head coach and Dallas Cowboys assistant coach Derek Dooley into the Missouri program to fill the void. For Dooley, a chance to return to the college game and in the SEC is one he embraced, and he seems to be looking forward to putting his past at Tennessee behind him as he hopes to help keep Missouri moving forward.

“Getting back into the crosshairs is a little bit more my personality,” Dooley said Friday at his first press conference with Missouri media, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “It’s easy to stay removed from the firing line. You guys have the ammo and you’re firing away. That’s OK. That’s your job. But there’s a lot of personalities (in coaching) that don’t like that. And that’s OK. They’re great coaches. But I guess that’s not mine. I’m a glutton for punishment.”

As far as Odom is concerned, he seems optimistic about hiring an offensive coordinator with a bit of a chip on his shoulder.

“He’s got something to prove,” Odom said. Odom also said he has something to prove. After a rough start to the 2017 season, Odom made a passionate claim he was the right guy to coach the Tigers. Sure enough, Missouri turned things around in a big way to reach a bowl game. The season ended with a loss to Texas in the bowl game, but that gives Odom a sense of unfinished business, a mantra his entire program can buy into this offseason.

Dooley certainly does. Back in the same division as Tenessee, Dooley hopes his work as offensive coordinator at Mizzou will erase the image he had when he went 15-21 as head coach of the Vols. Dooley will have a talented offense to work with next fall, which is led by the return of the SEC’s leading passer from last season, Drew Lock.

Remember when the Big 12 was flirting with possible expansion and toying with the minds of alleged Big 12 candidates before ultimately sweeping the rug out from under the schools lobbying for inclusion in the conference? Among the list of potential targets were UCF and USF, and now a Florida politician is looking to capitalize on the success of each school’s recent football season in an attempt to win some brownie points from voters.

Republican Representative Bobby Olszewski has written a letter to Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby, making sure the commissioner of the conference has not forgotten just how valuable the additions of UCF and USF could, in theory, be for the Big 12. The focus, of course, comes in with the all-important television ratings.

“More than ever during the college football season, we saw how important television ratings are to bowl games, the conferences, and the College Football Playoff,” Olszewski writes. “With UCF and USF representing the greater Central Florida and Tampa Bay media markets, our annual “War on I-4″ was one of the top television rated games this season en route to a 123 and 10 win season respectively for the UCF Knights and USF Bulls as well as both with top 25 final rankings.”

There have been no hints of possible expansion for the Big 12 on the horizon since the conference last openly discussed the idea, and the success of UCF and USF is not going to be enough to attract the Big 12 to re-opening the discussion again just yet. There may come a time when the Big 12 feels the itch to expand again, but the last time it discussed the idea it led to a complete meltdown. The Big 12 is doing just fine right now, but it could also be the conference in most need of some upgrades if the realignment fun does kick up again. And when it does, expect UCF and USF lobbyists pushing for the elusive Big 12 invite once again.

Helmet sticker to SB Nation.

For the second time this week, Michigan State is losing a wide receiver to an upcoming transfer. Trishton Jackson, coming off a sophomore season, has announced he will transfer to another school to continue his football career.

Jackson made the announcement on his Twitter account with a brief word of thanks to the Michigan State coaches and teammates. It is unknown at this time where Jackson will be heading next.

Jackson was seventh on the team with 143 receiving yards in 2017 with 12 receptions in 12 games. With a good number of receivers above him slated to return next fall, the opportunity to have much impact in the passing game may be found elsewhere before it will be available in East Lansing.

Jackson will have to sit out the 2018 college football season due to NCAA transfer rules if he transfers to another FBS program, but he will be eligible to play immediately at a lower-division program.

It was reported earlier this week that Hunter Rison, the son of Andre Rison, will be transferring out of the Spartans program.

Keith Jackson, the iconic and legendary voice of college football, passed away on Friday night. Jackson was 89.

Jackson spent his broadcasting career calling multiple events for ABC, from baseball to basketball and ABC’s Wide World of Sports, but he will always be connected to his work covering college football. If there was a big game being played on ABC, Keith Jackson’s voice would likely be behind the microphone. Jackson spent his entire career broadcasting college football starting in 1952, with the lone exception of when he did Monday Night Football one season. Jackson provided the narration for many iconic college football moments from regular season games to bowl games, and always delivered with his signature style that provided the tone of the moment but without letting the moment get buried in his signature voice.

Jackson’s final game assignment was a true classic, the 2006 Rose Bowl BCS National Championship Game between Texas and USC. It was a fitting way for Jackson’s final broadcast assignment to send him off into retirement.

Jackson has done more to lend his voice to college football’s history over the years before and after his retirement from broadcasting. His work on team videos have helped preserve the history of various college football programs and he continued to help the Big Ten Network with documentary features as well.

Jackson was awarded the Gold Medal Award by the National Football Foundation in 1999, and the Rose Bowl stadium’s TV booth has been named in his honor. It is Jackson that is largely credited with nicknaming the Rose Bowl “The Granddaddy of Them All.” Jackson is also believed to have nicknamed Michigan Stadium “The Big House.” Jackson had a wide-spanning appeal across the college football landscape because he had a deep understanding and appreciation of the sport from multiple angles. Jackson was able to relay the significance of different traditions and stories for the games he covered because he invested himself in the pageantry and tradition wherever he traveled.

Over the years, listening to Jackson call a game was more and more like having someone tell us a story, and we could not wait to hear what happened next.

Rest in peace, Keith Jackson, and thanks for all of the memories.



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here